Monday, September 21, 2020

PC Engine HuCard Volumes



Originally posted at the pcenginefx forums and reposted here in case that site disappears. The PC Engine HuCard volumes:

Hudson

  1. The Kung Fu
  2. Bikkuri World
  3. Victory Run
  4. Shanghai
  5. Necromancer
  6. Kato chan & Ken chan
  7. R-TYPE I
  8. Yuu Yuu Jinsei
  9. R-TYPE II
  10. Sengoku Mahjong
  11. Power League
  12. Mashin Eiyuuden Wataru
  13. Appare! Gateball
  14. Sadakichi Seven
  15. Dungeon Explorer
  16. Nectaris
  17. Susa No Ou Densetsu
  18. Power Golf
  19. Gunhed
  20. Power League II
  21. Super Momotarou Dentetsu
  22. Doraemon Meikyuu Daisakusen
  23. Neutopia
  24. PC Genjin
  25. Blodia
  26. Blodia Special
  27. Maniac Pro Wrestling
  28. Be Ball
  29. Momotarou Densetsu Turbo
  30. Super Star Soldier
  31. Power League III
  32. Momotarou Katsugeki
  33. Aero Blaster
  34. Bomberman
  35. Momotarou Densetsu II
  36. Jackie Chan
  37. Populous
  38. Adventure Island
  39. Power Eleven
  40. Final Soldier
  41. PC Genjin 2
  42. Power League IV
  43. Neutopia II
  44. Raiden
  45. Super Momotarou Dentetsu II
  46. Doraemon - Nobita No Dorabian Night
  47. Ninja Ryƫkenden
  48. Paxanadu
  49. Takahashi Meijin No Shinboukenjima
  50. Soldier Blade
  51. Power League V
  52. Honou No Doukyuuji Dodge Danpei
  53. Power Sports
  54. PC Denjin - Punkic Cyborgs
  55. Momotarou Densetsu Gaiden Daiichi
  56. Bomberman '93
  57. Battle Lode Runner
  58. PC Genjin 3
  59. Power Tennis
  60. Power League '93
  61. Bomberman '94

NCS Masaya

  1. Gaia No Monsho (Regarded as volume 1 although there is no number on the spine)
  2. Moto Roader
  3. Ganbare! Golf Boys
  4. Shubibinman
  5. Energy
  6. Double Dungeons
  7. Gai Flame
  8. Hisou Kihei Serd
  9. Nazo No Mascarade
  10. Kickball
  11. Wallaby
  12. Shubibinman 2
  13. Moto Roader 2
  14. Dragon Egg

Irem

  1. Vigilante
  2. Mr Heli No Daiboken
  3. Image Fight
  4. Ninja Sprit
  5. Legend of Hero Tonma
  6. Racing Damashii
  7. Gekisha Boy

Sunsoft

  1. Out-Live
  2. Benkai Gaiden
  3. City Hunter
  4. Mahjong Goku Special
  5. Batman

Nihon Bussan/Nichibutsu

  1. Mahjong Wars
  2. F1 Circus
  3. ?
  4. F1 Circus 91
  5. Fighting Run
  6. Terra Cresta II
  7. F1 Circus 92
  8. J-League Greatest Eleven

Face

  1. Hani In the Sky
  2. Cyber Cross
  3. Mahjong Gakuen
  4. Mahjong Gakuen Mild
  5. Ryuukyuu
  6. Hani On The Road
  7. Fushigi No Yume No Alice (Alice In Wonderdream)
  8. Cross Wiber
  9. Metal Stoker
  10. Time Cruise II

UPL

  1. Atomic Robo-Kid Special
  2. Gomola Speed

Cream

  1. Bullfight

Victor

  1. Makyo Densetsu
(Victor released many more hucards after this but none have a volume number.)

Tengen

  1. Klax

Big Club/Wolf Team

  1. Jinmu Denshou

Copy & Paste does not work in Firefox on Google Docs

Firefox blocks certain clipboard events by default. This breaks some Google Docs functionality. To reenable it, go to about:config and set dom.event.clipboardevents.enabled to true

Please be aware that this is a global setting and allows all websites access to your clipboard, which is a potential privacy/security risk.

Prevent Gentoo Portage from unmerging kernel sources during a world upgrade

Portage typically unmerges all but the newest kernel sources, while I'd prefer to leave the sources to the running kernel and backup kernel installed. I don't reboot very often and I don't bother to build an updated kernel until I'm ready to reboot, just in case there are any issues. I also like to keep the sources to the previous kernel around just in case I need to revert.

A tip posted on the Gentoo user mailing list in 2009 by Mike Kazantzev shows how to accomplish this:

First, define a kernel set in /etc/portage/sets.conf:

[kernels]
class = portage.sets.dbapi.OwnerSet
world-candidate = False
files = /usr/src

Tthen add the @kernel set to your /var/lib/portage/world_sets file.

By doing this, you will need to manually unmerge the specific kernel source packages you want to remove, but none of them will ever be removed otherwise.

Determining the manufacturer and recording medium of a blank CD or DVD

Every recordable CD and DVD actually has a little bit of data on the blank disc. On CDs this is called the ATIP (Absolute Time in Pregroove) and contains things like the manufacturer, length, dye type, and rated speed. This information is used by the disc drive to choose the optimal burning strategy. 

Keep in mind this info can be faked (Hong Kong manufacturers putting fake TY01 codes on their discs was a thing when Taiyo Yuden discs were in high demand). And the dye type is not necessarily the actual dye type used, but the hint to the drive about which burning mode to use (I've read that azo discs are burned using the cyanine strategy).

To view the atip of a CD-R/CD-RW on Linux using the cdrecord package:

# cdrecord -atip

Recordable DVDs have a similar area called the Media Identification Code. To read this information on Linux using the dvd+rw-tools package:

# dvd+rw-mediainfo /dev/sr0

SQL: Get just the date part of a DATETIME on SQL Server 2005

In Microsoft SQL Server 2008+ there is a DATE type, and getting just the date portion of a DATETIME is as easy as a cast or convert to DATE. But, at my job, we're still using SQL Server 2005. What then?

A common technique is to cast to a float, which gives you a number where the part to the left of the decimal point is the date and the part to the right of the decimal point is the time. Wrap that in a FLOOR function to round down to the nearest whole number and you have effectively truncated the time portion. You can then cast that back to a DATETIME.

I have, however, read that doing it that way can be inefficient as it won't use DATETIME indexes. Another approach that it supposed to be more efficient is to use DATEADD and DATEDIFF like so:

1
SELECT DATEADD([dd], 0, DATEDIFF([dd], 0, GETDATE()));

Again, there is no reason to do that unless you are on a Microsoft SQL Server version prior to 2008.

Easily straighten a crooked scan or photo in GIMP

To easily straighten a crooked scan or photo in GIMP, don't bother with manual rotation and rulers. Just use the Measure tool (Shift-M) and draw a line along a straight edge or horizon line of your image. Then click the "straighten" button and it will rotate the image to match the line you just drew.

Determining where a CD or DVD was manufactured

On factory-pressed CDs (and some DVDs), on the shiny side of the disc near the center spindle ring there is usually text, known as the matrix string. Old vinyl records usually had writings in the same area. You can sometimes determine where a disc was mastered or pressed by the text contained in this area. For example a music CD with the text "EMI JAX" was manufactured at EMI's manufacturing plant, located in Jacksonville, Illinois, just west of Springfield. Additionally there are sometimes text stamped or etched into the plastic mould such as "MADE IN USA BY PMDC" (indicating the disc was made by PolyGram Manufacturing And Distribution Centers in Grover, North Carolina). A search for the text on Discogs will usually yield useful information.

There was no standard to how any of that text was formatted and often it was not obvious where the disc was made. Beginning in 1994, Philips and the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry created a system of markings called a SID code (Source Identification). The goal of this was to be able to trace a disc back to its origins to fight piracy/counterfeiting. The SID code always begins with the letters "IFPI" followed by a 4- or 5-digit code. There are two types of SID codes. The matrix SID code (present in the matrix area of the disc) identifies where the glass master of the disc was cut. The Mould SID code (in the plastic area) identifies where the disc was pressed/stamped.

The most thorough list of SID codes I have found is on the Musik-Sammler wiki though again a search of Discogs often also provides clues.

Because of consolidation, a decline in CD sales and an increase in DVD sales, the disc pressing plants changed ownership quite often during the 90s and early 2000s. By identifying the codes or matrix text on your disc, it can help you narrow down when it was actually manufactured and whether it is an original release or a repress/reissue from later years. Sometimes the artwork and copyright dates are identical and the only difference the original pressing and a later reissue is on the matrix/SID codes.

There are pressing plants in Russia and China and other places that do not conform to this standard, so the lack of SID code does not automatically mean the disc is from before 1994. But the presence of one means it is surely no older than 1994.

SQL: TRY_CAST alternative for old versions of SQL Server

In modern versions of Microsoft SQL Server there is a TRY_CAST function which returns NULL if the type cast fails, and returns the converted value if it succeeds. This is helpful if you're trying to format numbers from non-sanitized input and somebody put malformed data into a field.

At my job, I'm still dealing with SQL Server 2005 which does not provide this function. An alternative that I found online was to use XML to accomplish the same result:


1
CAST('' AS XML).value('sql:column("ItemHeight") cast as xs:decimal ?', 'decimal(28,10)')

SQL: Replace repeated spaces with a single space

In SQL dialects that provide a REPLACE function you can replace instances of repeated spaces with a single space (you may replace CHAR(7) with another character that you know won't appear in your dataset):
1
SELECT REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE('some   string    with         many     spaces', '  ', ' ' + CHAR(7)), CHAR(7) + ' ', ''), ' ' + CHAR(7), ' ');

Rosetta Code

Rosetta Code is a programming chrestomathy site. The idea is to present solutions to the same task in as many different languages as possible, to demonstrate how languages are similar and different, and to aid a person with a grounding in one approach to a problem in learning another.

For example, to calculate the Fibonacci sequence in ArnoldC:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
IT'S SHOWTIME
 
HEY CHRISTMAS TREE f1
YOU SET US UP @I LIED
TALK TO THE HAND f1
 
HEY CHRISTMAS TREE f2
YOU SET US UP @NO PROBLEMO
 
HEY CHRISTMAS TREE f3
YOU SET US UP @I LIED
 
STICK AROUND @NO PROBLEMO
 
GET TO THE CHOPPER f3
HERE IS MY INVITATION f1
GET UP f2
ENOUGH TALK
TALK TO THE HAND f3
 
GET TO THE CHOPPER f1
HERE IS MY INVITATION f2
ENOUGH TALK
 
GET TO THE CHOPPER f2
HERE IS MY INVITATION f3
ENOUGH TALK
 
CHILL
 
YOU HAVE BEEN TERMINATED

Bit-Twiddling Hacks

Sean Eron Anderson has collected a great bunch of bit-twiddling hacks at his website. Even if you may never have a need for operating at this level, it's a good mental exercise to to solve these kinds of puzzles.

For example, a C macro to swap two values without use of a third variable and by only using addition and subtraction:

1
2
#define SWAP(a, b) ((&(a) == &(b)) || \
                    (((a) -= (b)), ((b) += (a)), ((a) = (b) - (a))))

If you really want to jump head-first into the deep end, check out the book Hacker's Delight by Henry S. Warren.